Ski Club of Manchester Lake District Walk - May 6th


By Norma Green and Brian Richards

This was a superb circular walk lead by Ian Harford starting at Troutbeck and summiting Yoke, III Bell and Frostwick. There is no official write-up for the main walk, but it is understood to have been very successful if a tad wet on the walk out along the valley at the end. However, the following is an amusing anecdote of the four intrepid hikers who risked life and limb to scale the dizzy heights of the beacon on High Street at 2569 feet.

Splinter group to Thornthwaite Crag

Report by Brian Richards

At the meeting point with the Roman Road, a discussion was held. Four of the group - one with a fractured shoulder and arm in sling, one with robotic knees, a nicotine addict and a member carrying an undamaged map - chose to continue up to Thornthwaite Crag.

Drizzle, and a gusty breeze aided the direction of travel, and led by speedy Mr Knees Thornthwaite Beacon at the top was soon reached. Here another snack was taken behind a conveniently placed dry-stone wall. Because of the need to dry a lighter flint, Mr Nicotine curtailed food and liquid input time so the group could descend to the lower altitude of Threshwaite Mouth. Here, warmer climes might renew its functionality.

The path down to the col was seriously eroded, requiring care with damp and greasy rock.

Thankfully Mr Shoulder manoeuvred with the skill of a mountain goat. A friend who has completed the Joss Naylor and Bob Graham rounds in the Lakes informs me that we should have run down the grass on the right. Thoughts of executing such vandalism on delicate vegetation were never contemplated. For a brief moment, as we descended, blue skies emerged and the view north towards sunlit Ullswater was cheering.

At the col the rain recommenced, and the walk down into Threshwaite Glen and alongside Pasture Beck was wet from above and damp and spongy below. It could have been boggier; there had been little rain for several weeks previous. A steady trek back to Troutbeck Church followed, with some confusion en-route because the O.S. map and the way-mark signs at a farm disagreed. Mr Map Reader - highly skilled and highly recommended, he must come again - led us around the farm and then found a delightful track avoiding the hazards of the main road to finally reach the car.

By finishing about 4.10 p.m. we had time to sample the delights of an excellent pint of beer in an Ambleside pub (the location of which requires a GPS and the name of which I forget). And to complete the day on a spectacular high, a free car park was found.

Once again a thank you to Ian for taking us into relatively unknown terrain.